Vine Germplasm: Rootstocks

GIANFRANCO TEMPESTA
MONICA FIORILO

4. ROOTSTOCKS IN OTHER COUNTRIES

As usual in our studies, we briefly analyzed the production and the use in other viticultural countries. Table 3.16. France: surface area and vine rootstocks with a diagram, clearly shows the wide variety of viticulture and hence the need for a useful range for different agronomic solutions.

Tabella6_5

Fig3_16

Indeed, the nursery offers a multiplicity of grafting combinations as shown in table 1.4 France: rootstocks used.

The Spanish situation, in table 3.17. Spain: vine rootstock surface areas, from “Tratado de Viticultura General” by Luis Hidalgo and, seeing the simplification of the data provided, more similar to the Italian one. The lack of 1103 Paulsen seems significant and strange. 

TABELLA6:6

Some viticultural countries, such as the United States, laid much importance on rootstocks resistant to nematodes, such as 1613 Courderc, Dogridge, Salt Creek, Harmony, and Freedom, which turned out to be so vehemently attacked by phylloxera that they had to resort to rebuilding Californian viticulture on rootstocks already used in Europe.

Chile, thanks to rigorous health protection (health cordon) and strict controls of imported material, still has ungrafted viticulture (Vitis vinifera lives on its fleshy roots), but it is rapidly converting to common rootstocks used in Europe, as already occurred in nearby Argentina.

The vineyard replanting, in historically viticultural areas, is subject to attacks from root cochineal (Margarodes vitis, fortunately not present in Europe) and requires resistant American hybrid rootstocks.

 

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